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There has been a misconception of the new messages feature Facebook is in the process of rolling out with invites. This misconception is that it’s email, when in fact it’s not, it’s bigger.

Instead of us having to worry about the various sources of technological communications and the preferences that our friends and family members have, Facebook is willing to do the work for us. This way we can stay connected and social in a simplistic and less spammy way.

Watch the video for an easy explanation of Facebook Messaging:

Do you think Facebook Messages will play a key impact in futuristic communications?

***


Soshable | Social Media Blog

Many cruise along the paved roads of Social Networks without giving much thought to their development or enhancement within our social ecosystem. They are fun, entertaining, and for the most part – very easy to figure out.

What if we analyze our historical growth in communication or the evolution of us as human beings and uncover the path from our first existence till today? Would we find out the explosion of Social Media was not in fact a genius creation put forth into motion and we as human beings just happened to find pleasure in it? Or would the remnants of our history unearth a deeper more scientific process that exposes social media as a natural procedure that was destined within the make up of the human evolution?

As this video suggests, and explains our homo-empathicus nature – It can’t help BUT leave you wondering….

***


Soshable | Social Media Blog

Posted by Aaron Wheeler

Video SEO isn’t something we always think about when optimizing, but we really should. In this week’s Whiteboard Friday, Danny Dover reviews some of the video SEO basics that every SEO should know about. After all, it’s a largely untapped market, unlike the Canadian maple tree market. Which is very tapped. (The Canadian maple tree video market, however, is quite untapped, but based on my scientific and extremely boring research in YouTube, I don’t recommend you pursue that market at all).

Anyways, we have a very special visitor this week, what with all of Danny’s meta discussions this month. Great Scott! That’s what happens when you get all meta and self-referential on us, Danny.

Embed video
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Video Transcription

Hello, everybody. My name is Danny Dover. I work here at SEOmoz doing SEO. For today’s Whiteboard Friday we’re going to be talking about video SEO. Now, last week I mentioned that was the most meta video we’d ever done. It was optimizing SEO resources, right? Now, this one is a video on video SEO. So this one, this one is the new champion of the most meta video that we have ever done here, and possibly the most meta video that you have ever seen. If there is some kind of disruption in the space-time continuum, totally my fault. I apologize.

–1.21 Gigawatts!?!–

That was unexpected. That was Doc from Back to the Future. A poor impression of it. Totally derailing my Whiteboard Friday. You’re killing me.

All right. Now, video SEO, huge opportunity here. This is more of a serious thing. Video SEO has low competition. You see in the universal results that video thumbnails show up about a third of the way from the top, right. You’re seeing little thumbnails. A lot of times it’s YouTube, but you also see Vimeo and lots of other video providers showing up. You are seeing those in lots and lots of SERPs, and increasing so actually. There is a huge demand from people because, you know, Google is doing A/B testing or multivariate testing. They’re seeing people are clicking on those. But, at the same time, you’ll have low competition. You’ll see a lot of times for very high competition keywords that have video results that the video results will just be kind of mediocre. They just kind of showed up there. Part of that is because it is new. Not a lot of people are optimizing for video, which is becoming extremely important. So, a lot of opportunity there.

The other part of this, I guess I can only talk for the United States, where I live, but the way that people are starting to consume media is changing drastically. We’ve all seen YouTube. We’ve all seen Vimeo. Now th
e devices people are using and the places they are watching video are different. You have things like the iPhone, the iPad, and the iPayWayTooMuchForGadgets and I am an Apple fanboy, kind of thing. You’re seeing these all over the place. There is the Android model, the operating system that is running lots and lots of things. system. You’re seeing the way that people are consuming media very differently. The market is growing. Based on that, the demand is high but the competition is really low. Lots of opportunity. This smells like money to me. This is huge. This is a big deal.

How do you take advantage of this? Well, there are different metrics the search engines use to look at video content. When the search engines crawl normal content, they can get some kind of idea of what text is trying to say by using their natural language processing algorithms. They can get some idea of what this text says just simply because they put so much time and so much energy into developing these algorithms to get some kind of semantic feeling for what text means. Now, this doesn’t translate directly into video because, part of the reason at least, is video is much bigger files. It takes a lot more processing to get an understanding of it. It is a lot more zeros and ones. With these Google and the search engines have provided Meta information that you can do about a video.

The two most important ones here are the title of the video — what do you title your video. That’s probably what people are going to search for, right. If it is the shoes video on YouTube or whatever it may be on YouTube. Those are a lot of times what people are searching for. That information turns out to be very important for video SEO.

Likewise, the description is also very important because it gives you more than whatever may be the character limit, probably around 140, I would guess for the title. But it gives you more text to describe it in more depth. This helps the search engines understand the video without having to go through all the intensive video processing.

Now, as video SEO is maturing, we’re starting to see more and more metrics start to affect the algorithm. So, let me be totally straightforward with this. This is just my speculation. I have not done tests on these ones. But they seem very likely to be impacting the video search results. My guess would be that they’ll be more impactful going forward. So, they are something to start paying attention to now.

The first one I see here is engagement stats. The most obvious one here is views. How many times is a video viewed? I know that when I go to YouTube and I search for something, after I look at the text, the title and the description, I then look at the views. Has this been watched 30 times or has it been watched 10 million times? It seems very, very likely to me that click-through rates are going to correlate with high view rates also. So, I think views are becoming increasingly important and are something that you should keep an eye on.

Number two is ratings. So, on YouTube they offer a five-point scale. On things like Vimeo and other things, they use a thumb up and a thumb down. That’s more similar to the Reddit system. These are actual humans who are giving their opinions and their expertise on video content. This is very helpful because search engines are designed to provide results for humans. Any imput you can get from humans is helpful for getting output for humans. This is something that Google figured out very early and is something that is very important.

Number three, comments. What could be more human than commenting on videos? In YouTube’s case, it is some of the lowest thresholds of intelligence we’ve ever seen on the Internet, which is really saying something. You have floor chant, below that you have YouTube comments. It is kind of rough, right. But this is a metric of actual human beings engaging with content and with the author or producer of the video. This seems like a very important metric to me. I don’t think it is the content of the comments, because they are awful. But I think it is the volume of it and the kind of themes that people are talking about. Are they saying, "this is awesome" or "this sucks?" I think that does have some kind of impact on it.

The last one is social metrics. Really, I think this is universal. It is not just the video vertical; I think it is the other verticals as well. By social metrics, I mean things like the amount of tweets or what people are saying in tweets, Delicious popular saves, or submissions to Reddit or Digg or any of those other things. How are people talking about this with their friends? So, you have things like the QDF algorithm, which is Google’s Query Deserves Freshness algorithm. What this does is it will artificially inflate the ability for something to rank based on temporal metrics. So, if lots and lots of people are linking to something or tweeting about it, then it can artificially rank higher than things that normally wouldn’t just because it is very important. You see this a lot of times with natural disasters. Things will just rise to the top when normally they wouldn’t. Michael Jackson stuff. We saw lots and lots of QDF stuff really blowing, making things rank when normally there was no way they would. This is something to keep in mind also. These social metrics.

Now, duration. I think is the last one. This one is more about the extremes, finding the outlier. If a video is three seconds long, it is probably not something that Google, Bing, or Yahoo will want to rank highly. At the same time, if it is something that is multiple hours long, they might want to rank it, but it is probably not what people are going to look for when they are doing video. One of the things about video and content on the Internet in general is that people want to consume it quickly. They like bulleted lists. They like quick pictures, inforgraphic types of things, and they like short videos. I should probably take my own advice and get to the end here. So, I’ll try to do that.

The last one we have for you is tactics. I have expressed that there is a huge opportunity here. I have talked about some of the metrics that are important. Now, tactics, the search engines have given you several tools on how to do this. Video sitemaps is, not new, because video sitemaps have existed for a while, but the protocol was recently revamped by the major search engines and the people who are involved with that protocol. They’ve added a couple of things that are interested. They’ve added the location of the thumbnail of the video. They’ve added things like if it is family friendly or not. They’ve added the URL of where the video is embedded. So, from an SEO perspective, this is really interesting. We don’t want links going to YouTube anymore because YouTube has plenty of links. Instead, with the new video sitemap, you can provide the URL of where it is embedded and then when the search engines index that content they’ll link back to you. So, it’s not so much that you get a link from it per se, but you get the click-through. So, someone clicking on the SERP, clicking that thumbnail, is going to go to your blog, where you embedded the video, rather than to the hosting provider. This is a big win for us SEOs and for us content producers.

The other one is transcriptions. So, what could be easier than just going back and using the old tactics you already have for creating content? With transcriptions, you take video, you take the audio from the video, and you turn it into plain text. This is something that the search engines can then use and interpret just like they do a normal web page. This is important for search engines, but it is also important for human beings as well. People with hearing impairments who can’t hear this video right now can then go through and read it. They can understand it that way. International people who are speaking different languages can then go through the content and read at their own
pace. They can do whatever tools they need to translate it. It helps spread it more. It is both good for humans and for users, which is a win-win and that’s always the situation I try to get when I do SEO.

I recommend that you always try to go for those win-wins, because ultimately what the search engines are doing is chasing after the idea of getting the best information to human beings. I think that’s what it really comes down to, crafting your content for human beings. It is harder to do with video SEO, but it is becoming more and more possible to do it.

I appreciate your time today. I will see you next week.

Video transcription by SpeechPad.com



Follow Danny on Twitter! Even more to your benefit, follow SEOmoz! Alternatively, you can always follow me, Aaron.

If you have any tips or advice that you’ve learned along the way, or if you came back from the future, we’d love to hear about it in the comments below. Post your comment and be heard!

Do you like this post? Yes No


SEOmoz Daily SEO Blog

Posted by Aaron Wheeler

Video SEO isn’t something we always think about when optimizing, but we really should. In this week’s Whiteboard Friday, Danny Dover reviews some of the video SEO basics that every SEO should know about. After all, it’s a largely untapped market, unlike the Canadian maple tree market. Which is very tapped. (The Canadian maple tree video market, however, is quite untapped, but based on my scientific and extremely boring research in YouTube, I don’t recommend you pursue that market at all).

Anyways, we have a very special visitor this week, what with all of Danny’s meta discussions this month. Great Scott! That’s what happens when you get all meta and self-referential on us, Danny.

Embed video
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Video Transcription

Hello, everybody. My name is Danny Dover. I work here at SEOmoz doing SEO. For today’s Whiteboard Friday we’re going to be talking about video SEO. Now, last week I mentioned that was the most meta video we’d ever done. It was optimizing SEO resources, right? Now, this one is a video on video SEO. So this one, this one is the new champion of the most meta video that we have ever done here, and possibly the most meta video that you have ever seen. If there is some kind of disruption in the space-time continuum, totally my fault. I apologize.

–1.21 Gigawatts!?!–

That was unexpected. That was Doc from Back to the Future. A poor impression of it. Totally derailing my Whiteboard Friday. You’re killing me.

All right. Now, video SEO, huge opportunity here. This is more of a serious thing. Video SEO has low competition. You see in the universal results that video thumbnails show up about a third of the way from the top, right. You’re seeing little thumbnails. A lot of times it’s YouTube, but you also see Vimeo and lots of other video providers showing up. You are seeing those in lots and lots of SERPs, and increasing so actually. There is a huge demand from people because, you know, Google is doing A/B testing or multivariate testing. They’re seeing people are clicking on those. But, at the same time, you’ll have low competition. You’ll see a lot of times for very high competition keywords that have video results that the video results will just be kind of mediocre. They just kind of showed up there. Part of that is because it is new. Not a lot of people are optimizing for video, which is becoming extremely important. So, a lot of opportunity there.

The other part of this, I guess I can only talk for the United States, where I live, but the way that people are starting to consume media is changing drastically. We’ve all seen YouTube. We’ve all seen Vimeo. Now th
e devices people are using and the places they are watching video are different. You have things like the iPhone, the iPad, and the iPayWayTooMuchForGadgets and I am an Apple fanboy, kind of thing. You’re seeing these all over the place. There is the Android model, the operating system that is running lots and lots of things. system. You’re seeing the way that people are consuming media very differently. The market is growing. Based on that, the demand is high but the competition is really low. Lots of opportunity. This smells like money to me. This is huge. This is a big deal.

How do you take advantage of this? Well, there are different metrics the search engines use to look at video content. When the search engines crawl normal content, they can get some kind of idea of what text is trying to say by using their natural language processing algorithms. They can get some idea of what this text says just simply because they put so much time and so much energy into developing these algorithms to get some kind of semantic feeling for what text means. Now, this doesn’t translate directly into video because, part of the reason at least, is video is much bigger files. It takes a lot more processing to get an understanding of it. It is a lot more zeros and ones. With these Google and the search engines have provided Meta information that you can do about a video.

The two most important ones here are the title of the video — what do you title your video. That’s probably what people are going to search for, right. If it is the shoes video on YouTube or whatever it may be on YouTube. Those are a lot of times what people are searching for. That information turns out to be very important for video SEO.

Likewise, the description is also very important because it gives you more than whatever may be the character limit, probably around 140, I would guess for the title. But it gives you more text to describe it in more depth. This helps the search engines understand the video without having to go through all the intensive video processing.

Now, as video SEO is maturing, we’re starting to see more and more metrics start to affect the algorithm. So, let me be totally straightforward with this. This is just my speculation. I have not done tests on these ones. But they seem very likely to be impacting the video search results. My guess would be that they’ll be more impactful going forward. So, they are something to start paying attention to now.

The first one I see here is engagement stats. The most obvious one here is views. How many times is a video viewed? I know that when I go to YouTube and I search for something, after I look at the text, the title and the description, I then look at the views. Has this been watched 30 times or has it been watched 10 million times? It seems very, very likely to me that click-through rates are going to correlate with high view rates also. So, I think views are becoming increasingly important and are something that you should keep an eye on.

Number two is ratings. So, on YouTube they offer a five-point scale. On things like Vimeo and other things, they use a thumb up and a thumb down. That’s more similar to the Reddit system. These are actual humans who are giving their opinions and their expertise on video content. This is very helpful because search engines are designed to provide results for humans. Any imput you can get from humans is helpful for getting output for humans. This is something that Google figured out very early and is something that is very important.

Number three, comments. What could be more human than commenting on videos? In YouTube’s case, it is some of the lowest thresholds of intelligence we’ve ever seen on the Internet, which is really saying something. You have floor chant, below that you have YouTube comments. It is kind of rough, right. But this is a metric of actual human beings engaging with content and with the author or producer of the video. This seems like a very important metric to me. I don’t think it is the content of the comments, because they are awful. But I think it is the volume of it and the kind of themes that people are talking about. Are they saying, "this is awesome" or "this sucks?" I think that does have some kind of impact on it.

The last one is social metrics. Really, I think this is universal. It is not just the video vertical; I think it is the other verticals as well. By social metrics, I mean things like the amount of tweets or what people are saying in tweets, Delicious popular saves, or submissions to Reddit or Digg or any of those other things. How are people talking about this with their friends? So, you have things like the QDF algorithm, which is Google’s Query Deserves Freshness algorithm. What this does is it will artificially inflate the ability for something to rank based on temporal metrics. So, if lots and lots of people are linking to something or tweeting about it, then it can artificially rank higher than things that normally wouldn’t just because it is very important. You see this a lot of times with natural disasters. Things will just rise to the top when normally they wouldn’t. Michael Jackson stuff. We saw lots and lots of QDF stuff really blowing, making things rank when normally there was no way they would. This is something to keep in mind also. These social metrics.

Now, duration. I think is the last one. This one is more about the extremes, finding the outlier. If a video is three seconds long, it is probably not something that Google, Bing, or Yahoo will want to rank highly. At the same time, if it is something that is multiple hours long, they might want to rank it, but it is probably not what people are going to look for when they are doing video. One of the things about video and content on the Internet in general is that people want to consume it quickly. They like bulleted lists. They like quick pictures, inforgraphic types of things, and they like short videos. I should probably take my own advice and get to the end here. So, I’ll try to do that.

The last one we have for you is tactics. I have expressed that there is a huge opportunity here. I have talked about some of the metrics that are important. Now, tactics, the search engines have given you several tools on how to do this. Video sitemaps is, not new, because video sitemaps have existed for a while, but the protocol was recently revamped by the major search engines and the people who are involved with that protocol. They’ve added a couple of things that are interested. They’ve added the location of the thumbnail of the video. They’ve added things like if it is family friendly or not. They’ve added the URL of where the video is embedded. So, from an SEO perspective, this is really interesting. We don’t want links going to YouTube anymore because YouTube has plenty of links. Instead, with the new video sitemap, you can provide the URL of where it is embedded and then when the search engines index that content they’ll link back to you. So, it’s not so much that you get a link from it per se, but you get the click-through. So, someone clicking on the SERP, clicking that thumbnail, is going to go to your blog, where you embedded the video, rather than to the hosting provider. This is a big win for us SEOs and for us content producers.

The other one is transcriptions. So, what could be easier than just going back and using the old tactics you already have for creating content? With transcriptions, you take video, you take the audio from the video, and you turn it into plain text. This is something that the search engines can then use and interpret just like they do a normal web page. This is important for search engines, but it is also important for human beings as well. People with hearing impairments who can’t hear this video right now can then go through and read it. They can understand it that way. International people who are speaking different languages can then go through the content and read at their own
pace. They can do whatever tools they need to translate it. It helps spread it more. It is both good for humans and for users, which is a win-win and that’s always the situation I try to get when I do SEO.

I recommend that you always try to go for those win-wins, because ultimately what the search engines are doing is chasing after the idea of getting the best information to human beings. I think that’s what it really comes down to, crafting your content for human beings. It is harder to do with video SEO, but it is becoming more and more possible to do it.

I appreciate your time today. I will see you next week.

Video transcription by SpeechPad.com



Follow Danny on Twitter! Even more to your benefit, follow SEOmoz! Alternatively, you can always follow me, Aaron.

If you have any tips or advice that you’ve learned along the way, or if you came back from the future, we’d love to hear about it in the comments below. Post your comment and be heard!

Do you like this post? Yes No


SEOmoz Daily SEO Blog

At the risk of giving away too much of what we do (not really – everything we do in social media is in the public, so you just need to pay attention or search around to find out), I’d like to share with you a little bit about Ford Motor Company’s approach to social media.

Here’s a great video that WebPro News did when we were at Blog World Expo last October. It captures a lot of what Ford is doing in the space.

I keep a clipsheet of coverage of our social media efforts (using Profilactic), which is helpful when speaking to reporters or digital media and they’re looking for examples of how our work has resonated. I simply refer them to our links and they can sort through the filters to find what they’re looking for.

On his blog, Jeff Bullas gave away The 7 Secrets to Ford’s Social Media Marketing Success last month. There are some great takeaways there for any company that’s interested in social media and some that are specific to Ford and our efforts. And Slate.com’s The Big Money covered the success we’ve seen from the first wave of the Fiesta Movement.

We’re working on a lot more – notably Chapter 2 of the Fiesta Movement, in which there are 20 teams of two in 16 cities across the country, creating mini marketing campaigns through social media as well as offline events and media. And our social media strategy is global, reflecting the growing interest from many areas around the company and around the world.

And we maintain profiles on a number of social networks, including profiles on Twitter: @Ford, @FordCustService, @FordFiesta, @FordAutoShows, @FordLatino, @FordEU, @FordAPA and more. In addition, we’ve got some employees on Twitter. You can find the full list at http://twitter.com/ScottMonty/ford.

We also have a number of Facebook pages, the most prominent of which are Ford and Mustang. All of our pages are favorited on the Ford page, so you can pick which ones you’d like to become a fan of.

In addition, we’re active on Flickr for photo sharing, YouTube for videos, Plancast and Upcoming for events, Delicious for public bookmarking, and Scribd for document sharing (where we’re the #5 most followed profile). And if you’re ever in doubt where to find us, you can see our profiles on the front of Ford.com or on The Ford Story.

Lots of stuff going on right now that’s keeping us really busy. Just thought you’d like a window into what some of it is and why we’re doing it.

Disclosure: http://cmp.ly/4

The Social Media Marketing Blog
Post image for Vzaar Video Hosting Service Review

The following is a sponsored post.

For this post I’m going to be taking a look a third party video player from Vzaar.com. As Google continues to emphasize videos with universal search, not including them part of your overall search marketing strategy is probably not a smart move. In the past Google would only show video results from high reliability websites like Youtube, MetaCafe and Video Jug. However in recent months you can host videos on your own site as long as the hosting is reliable.

In the past people would upload videos to places like Youtube and cross the project off their to-do list and call it a day. The problem was at the end of every video Youtube would show related video, in an effort to keep you watching. if you where a merchant selling a product, or someone selling information like an ebook, or trying to get people to sign up to a mailing list these related videos where a distraction, keeping people from entering your conversion funnel. If you use third party players like the one from Vzaar you don’t have that issue to worry about. Another issue with Youtube is they have started showing advertising overlays, and you never know when your competition might show up on your video.

Vzaar has worked with some large companies like ToysRUs, Walmart, and Budweiser, you can see samples of other clients on their showcase page. They also have a lot of other features like player skins, video settings, ecommerce, analytics, ebay integration, mail chimp integration, and more you can see the full list on the features page. You can take and upload your videos as you would any other video service, you don’t need special equipment. A computer webcam, digital camera, or mobile phone work fine (my video came from the front facing camera of an iphone 4)

This is a paid service, so it’s for people and businesses who are professionals, it’s not the place to upload the funny videos of your cat in the bathtub. They have a limited free trial so you can give it a try, professional plans start at a month for 50GB of video playback. You can get more information about it and other plans on the pricing page.

If you’ve tried using videos in the past and not gotten the conversions you where looking for and where losing people to more Youtube videos, this is a service you should probably look at you can get more info from Vzaar.com.

The preceding has been a sponsored post. Find out more information about sponsored posts

This post originally came from Michael Gray who is an SEO Consultant. Be sure not to miss the Thesis WordPress Theme review.

Vzaar Video Hosting Service Review

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Michael Gray – Graywolf’s SEO Blog

Posted by Danny Dover

  Want happier website visitors and higher rankings? This week’s Whiteboard Friday is about how and why to speed up your website. It is more technical than previous videos so I tried to spice it up with an ode to one of my favorite canceled TV Shows, Pop-up Video. Can’t stand the content? At least the added commentary is entertaining. (It is the perfect plan ;-p)



7 Ways to Take Advantage of Google’s Site Speed Algorithm

The following are seven proven techniques well known websites use to boost their site speed.

1. Enable Gzip

Gzip is a open source compression algorithm that can used to compress your website’s content before your server sends the data to a visitor’s browser. This makes your servers job easier and makes pages load faster for your users. You can learn how to enable Gzip here.

2. Minify Javascript/CSS

Minify is the process (and software) for removing unnecessary formatting characters from code. This makes your files smaller and your visitors happier. You can learn all about this process here.

3. Use a CDN (Content Distribution Network)

CDNs are systems of interconnected server resources that spread content and assets around the globe to shorten the distance between server and prospective user. They are commonly used by the Web’s most popular websites. You can find a list of free CDNs here.

4. Optimize Images

You can take advantage of the countless man hours that have been devoted to image compression and make your users happier by simply saving your images as the appropriate type. As a very general rule of thumb, I recommend saving photos as JPEGs and graphics as PNGs.

5. Use External Javascript/CSS

When a browser requests a website from a server it can only download a set number of files of the same type at any given point. While this isn’t true of all file types, it is a good enough reason to host applicable files on alternative subdomains. This is only recommended for sites where the pros of speed will outweigh the SEO cons of creating a new subdomain.

6. Avoid Using Excess Redirects

While redirects can be extremely useful, it is important to know that implementing them does force your servers to do slightly more work per applicable request. Always avoid redirect strings (301 -> 301 -> 200 or even worse 301 -> 302 -> 200) and use these tools sparingly.

7. Use Fewer Files

The most straightforward way to speed up your website is to simply use fewer files. Less files means less data. My favorite method of doing this is utilizing CSS sprites. You can read how popular websites are using this trick here.


Google’s Mission to Speed Up the Web

Fueled by the massive potential of the Internet, Googlers are working on many projects in their attempt to speed up the Web:



Follow me on Twitter, Fool!
or
Follow SEOmoz on Twitter (who is slightly less blunt)

If you have any other advice that you think is worth sharing, feel free to post it in the comments. This post is very much a work in progress. As always, feel free to e-mail me if you have any suggestions on how I can make my posts more useful. All of my contact information is available on my SEOmoz profile under Danny. Thanks!

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SEOmoz Daily SEO Blog

Posted by Danny Dover

 This weeks Whiteboard Friday is a little bit different than normal but a lot more awesome. I took the lead this week and am sharing 5 tips that beginners can use to get links from bloggers. This educational video is full to the brim with helpful tips, odd tangents and one very poor impression of a news anchor.

 


 

The Beginner’s Guide to Getting Links from Bloggers

Try all of the following tactics and focus on building upon whichever one works best for your situation.

Check BoxMake Lists of Niche Linkers (and post them) – Most bloggers are by nature marketers. Take of advantage of this by writing material that helps them market themselves. For example, if you wanted to get a link from a blog in the car space, you might make a list of the top 3 Honda Civic blogs. Remember to go niche and avoid stating the obvious (I.E. Techcrunch is the number one tech blog). "The obvious" doesn’t attract links.

Check BoxDo Interviews – This tactic has two main benefits. First, by conducting interviews you get interesting content to write about. What could be more interesting than what the industry experts are talking about? (Clever interviewers will realize the answer is the stuff the experts don’t want to talk about). Secondly, by getting your name/brand in the head of an expert, you have more chances of getting links from them in the future.

Check BoxBe Virtually Social – Being virtually social is easy and can provide higher short term ROI than talking to people face to face. (e.g. It is easier to get a link from someone who is in the process of writing something online than it is to get a link from someone who is not at a computer.) I use the following three avenues to do this:

  • Facebook – Since Facebook replaced "Fan" with "Like", it is now easier than ever to promote your work via Facebook without being too "salesy". This won’t get you links per say (as the entire process exists within Facebook’s ecosystem) but it can help drive traffic.
  • Twitter – Like Facebook, Twitter won’t necessarily help you build followed links but it does help you spread your brand/product/idea around the net. This makes it a good long term strategy.
  • Blogs – One great way to get links is to find supporting evidence for a given blog post and letting it’s author know about it. If they use it, they are likely to cite you as the source.

funny pictures of cats with captions

In addition to promoting my work on Twitter, I use the platform to spread Internet awesomeness. (Thus the image above)

Check BoxMake In-Person Connections – This is the best long term way to get links. When bloggers are trying to come up with supporting evidence for a point they are trying to make, they are much more likely to use a example that is already in their head than they are to go out and search for it. The best way to get into someones head (other than a chisel) is to meet them and spend time with them. (Wait a chisel? Did anyone else read that?)

Check BoxSend Linkers Demos of Things (Websites, New Products, Games, Etc…) That You Want Links To and Include the Linkers Stuff In It. – This tactic is newer and has been proving to work very well. If you want coverage from a specific blogger, try including their blog in the product demo and sending it to them. This way they can promote themselves while promoting your work.


Danny Dover Twitter

If you have any other advice that you think is worth sharing, feel free to post it in the comments. This post is very much a work in progress. As always, feel free to e-mail me if you have any suggestions on how I can make my posts more useful. All of my contact information is available on my SEOmoz profile under Danny. Thanks!

Do you like this post? Yes No


SEOmoz Daily SEO Blog
Facebook’s former Chief Privacy Officer Chris Kelly is running for attorney general in the state of California, but rival Kamala Harris is running a TV attack ad that claims “his only experience is designing the Facebook privacy policy condemned across the country.”

The ad concludes, “Chris Kelly released your private information.” Kelly took the privacy chief job at the social networking site in 2005, then resigned on March 16, 2010 during his run for public office, but the ad’s accusations might not be factual.

Politico reports that he wrote an e-mail to progressive hub MoveOn.org criticizing Facebook’s privacy policy, and according to Time Magazine he went on hiatus from the company back in August, possibly before the development of the Instant Personalization feature that has drawn such ire from users who feel that their privacy is threatened.

Harris has been slamming Kelly for his involvement at Facebook for a while now. One of her statements read, “If Kelly couldn’t stand up to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on behalf of Facebook users, how on earth can Californians trust Kelly to go to bat on their behalf as attorney general?” She’s currently the front-runner in the race for the democratic nomination, leading Kelly by 11% in one poll.

This new ad — which is probably the first TV attack ad to focus on Facebook — brought the spat to millions of TV screens in the Los Angeles area on Tuesday.



The Ad


width="640" height="505">name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/maj2jEZ-59c&hl=en_US&fs=1&">name="allowFullScreen" value="true">name="allowscriptaccess" value="always">wmode="opaque" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/maj2jEZ-59c&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="505">

[via The Los Angeles Times]




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Tags: advertising, attack ad, attorney general, california, chris kelly, facebook, kamala harris, L.A., Los Angeles, politics, privacy


Mashable!

From vests to dresses, it’s clear that the iPad is this spring’s hottest fashion accessory. However, we should really credit Stephen Colbert for kicking this whole trend off — after all, he did show off the iPad at the Grammy Awards just days after the product was first announced.

It seems that The Wall Street Journal didn’t get that memo. In an article on a new kind of iPad-friendly suit jacket (nearly identical to the same system Colbert used back in January), there was nary a mention of everyone’s favorite faux-pundit. Stephen Colbert being, well, Stephen Colbert, called the publication out in style.

I just want to know when a women’s version of the iPad-friendly power suit will be made.

[hat tip: 9to5Mac]




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Tags: humor, ipad, ipad clothing, ipad suit, stephen colbert


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